Charlotte Hussein
Charlotte Hussein
Human Resources, Wiley

This past April, thousands of employers in the UK were required to publish their gender pay gap figures for the first time.  In response, Wiley UK published its own report at that time and we want to Gender pay gap meeting-small.jpgshare our progress on a series of actions we’ve taken to demonstrate our commitment to addressing our own gender pay gap.

 

Our findings made it clear that a gender pay gap exists within the organization and we take these results very seriously.  We want to see everyone succeed by focusing on equal opportunity, development and achievement.

 

In addition to bringing in an external consultant to provide guidance on Wiley’s gender balance, our main focus has been to establish a working group of 50 UK based colleagues who volunteered their time to look at the causes of the gender pay gap in Wiley UK and how to resolve them. Six different workstreams were set up under a Steering Group to look at specific areas: Leadership, Supportive Working Practices, Recruitment and Training, Communication, External Engagement and Data Analysis. The steering group will present their recommendations to our Executive Leadership Team in July.

 

By engaging colleagues at a grass roots level, we found a high level of support and enthusiasm among them to become involved and make a difference. We held a series of live panel discussions with all of our UK colleagues to update them on our progress and to allow them to ask questions and share their views and opinions. This was very much a two-way, collaborative process which will help inform our recommendations and will serve as the first step toward remedying this issue.

 

“I believe that Wiley is taking an active and positive approach by engaging the whole of the UK based workforce in suggesting ways we can address the GPG”, said Karen Wootton, VP, Sales, EMEA, co-regional leader, Wiley UK and GPG Steering Group member, “It is not so much about data that has to be submitted as a legal requirement but about making the changes in our working environment that ensure that everyone can work, develop and progress in an inclusive and non-discriminatory workplace”.

 

So, what does change look like?  Although women currently make up 62% of the Wiley UK workforce and Wiley’s two largest global businesses are led by women which, combined, make up 85% of Wiley’s total revenue, we want to ensure that both women and men are fulfilling their potential, regardless of their role.

 

That’s why, over the coming months, we’ll be encouraging colleagues to focus on their personal development and we’ll be implementing a global initiative to enhance the talent pipeline to support and prepare all high performers, regardless of gender, to move up as our pay gap is significant at more senior levels as there’s currently a lack of diversity at the more senior levels.  We’re dedicated to inclusivity and diversity across our global organization and we’re proud of our thriving community groups, such as Generation Wiley (committed to enhancing early career colleagues’ experience), Lean In, and our LGBTQ group, which provide platforms for career and development conversations with peers and foster a rich and open culture at Wiley.

 

As GPG Steering Group member Ben Hall, Digital Marketing Manager, puts it, “Gender Pay Gap is a cultural issue. Culture is the engine oil which drives Wiley forward every day.  The key to culture is making sure your values are clear and actionable. These values must resonate with each colleague and be consistent across the organization.”

 

On a personal level, I’m proud of the way my colleagues have responded to the challenge of helping us close this gap, and it’s been exciting to see how creative and involved they have been in
addressing the issue.

 

Charlotte is a member of the Gender Pay Gap Steering Group, along with six others, representing diverse roles within the business.