Kathryn Coble 
Kathryn Coble
Community Marketing, Wiley 
Source: Ryan J Reilly, Wikimedia Creative Commons
Source: Ryan J Reilly, Wikimedia Creative Commons

As researchers, ‘impact’ is a driving factor behind many funding priorities in the academic world. And by 'impact' we often mean citations. But what about real impact? How can researchers in fields such as History, Business, Psychology, Education and Philosophy influence social change on a global level?

This month we're bringing research to bear on the often hot-button issues surrounding the LGBT community, helping the voices of researchers contribute to the social constructions of our world. We want philosophers, like those whose work on biomedical ethics appears in The Hastings Center Report, to have their impact felt in the daily work of a medical practitioner who sees transgendered patients. We want the scholarly review of LGBT couples in film and media studies to help cast a critical eye on film, media, and literature and change the LGBT literary and artistic canon. Most importantly, we want researchers and experts to open communication lines for discussion on topics relevant to other research communities and demonstrate the impact of interdisciplinary research in the real world.

“…the story of gay and lesbian people and the law is not yet finished, and the meaning of homosexuality for bioethics is still being written too.” —Timothy F. Murphy, Hastings Center Report

We invite you to explore our special collection of scholarly content related to the LGBT community. In collaboration with researchers, authors and experts, we’re opening this interdisciplinary conversation through the Philosopher’s Eye blog, a forum for scholars and general readers on topics relating to Philosophy and society. Throughout the month, scholars and authors will contribute original blog posts to discuss important questions raised by the research. We encourage everyone to engage with these blog posts and the research by commenting through the Philosopher’s Eye and sharing this content by word of mouth or social media.

As Ann Larabee, an editor of the Journal of Popular Culture writes in her blog post, “Much has been written on the importance of [Bruce] Jenner’s revelation for the acceptance of transgendered people but the interview also gives a fascinating glimpse into aging celebrity,” meanwhile, Bruce Drushel from the Journal of American Culture is reflecting upon the portrayal of the LGBT Couple in media and film. Annika Thiem, a local board member of Hypatia, is revisiting the academic voice of philosophy and queer studies, calling for a change in the rhetoric that would eliminate the distance between philosophers as personal observers of queer studies and writing as the “queer we”. Each blog explores an intimate piece of LGBT conversation, calling upon the reader to think critically about the ways in which we view our world and how we can immerse the LGBT community into our version of “us”. Considerations around the LGBT community expand across psychology in terms of family or marital therapy, child psychology, education, and we’ve asked the experts in those fields to weigh in as well. This special collection and blog really explore a wealth of research across many disciplines and begin a necessary conversation about how we approach education and practice concerning this community. As Timothy Murphy says in his blog post, The Physician, The Bioethicist, and the LGBT Community, “LGBT people are and are not like everyone else.”

The blog will continue to host guest blog editorials from prominent journals all month. Join the conversation and impact today: http://thephilosopherseye.com/.