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2016
    Laura Goldsberry
Laura Goldsberry
Marketing Manager, Wiley

How do view your direct reports? Are you a “teaching” manager? Teaching managers actively work to help their reports achieve success. They achieve this through the use of open communication and active listening, and by taking best practices and promulgating them as the standard, not the exception. Learn more ways to become a "teaching" manager below.

 


Interested in learning more about skills to take your people management to the next level? Check out the book.

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    Laura Goldsberry
Laura Goldsberry
Marketing Manager, Wiley

What behaviors do emerging leaders practice? Did you realize that cultivating your relationships with others is integral to your own personal success? Below is 6-step blueprint for success either on campus, in corporate settings or at community events.

 

These tips are from Peter F. Drucker’s Five Most Important Questions: Enduring Wisdom for Today’s Leader. Feel free to share your own tips for success in the comments below.

 

    Laura Goldsberry
Laura Goldsberry
Marketing Manager, Wiley

Employers sometimes think they’ve found a candidate with all the right soft and technical skills, so they hire them before another organization can make an offer. But what if that employee’s attitude doesn’t live up to expectations?

 

Regardless if it’s a new recruit or a long time employee, it may signal a need for an attitude adjustment. An individual’s attitude at work can affect their productivity and even hurt the organization’s bottom line.

 

Managers should take action immediately to contain and correct the problem. However, it can be difficult to know how and when to bring up an attitude adjustment with a colleague or employee. How many bad days signal the need for a sit down meeting? What’s acceptable behavior and what isn’t? It all comes down to knowing your employees. A few bad days across the span of the year is natural, but if an individual is bringing down the team dynamic with constant negativity, it’s time for someone to step in.

 

To learn more about how to spot attitude red flags and how managers can address and prevent these issues, check out these 5 tips for zeroing in on negative employee behaviors, one at a time, based on The 27 Challenges Managers Face by Bruce Tulgan and published by Wiley.

 

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    Laura Goldsberry
Laura Goldsberry
Marketing Manager, Wiley

In today’s busy world, managing your workload can be difficult, but it can be even more difficult when you feel like you have to manage your boss as well. It’s hard enough just keeping yourself on task some days!

 

However, if you feel like your boss isn’t necessarily pulling his/her weight or setting the best example, should you jump in and tell him/her? There are a variety of factors that need to go into that decision. Everything from your place in the company to your past history with your boss should be taken into account when deciding if you should step up. Above all, you need to make sure your own behavior is above reproach before you go about correcting someone else. If you’re in a situation where your own actions can be questioned, your boss will miss your message entirely as the focus switches to you.

 

Along with those considerations, there are also certain times and ways this situation should be approached to minimize the chances of embarrassment and hard feelings.  If you choose to approach your boss, do so in a private setting and make sure to be a problem solver and not just a complainer. Pointing out undesirable behavior will not help unless there is a viable solution to the issue.

 

Learn more ways to effectively approach your relationship with your boss here.

 

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    Christine Romans
Christine Romans
CNN correspondent and author
Source: Dmitriy Shironosov/iStockphoto
Source: Dmitriy Shironosov/iStockphoto

You've got two minutes.

The typical hiring manager will spend about two minutes reviewing each resume, CareerBuilder estimates. Most employers (86%) typically have more than one employee review candidates’ resumes. Your resume and cover letter need to be relevant, accurate, and powerful. Your cover letter has to hook the reader in the first sentence. After that, it needs a fast-paced and exciting narrative to pull the interviewer in. If you are like most of us, you will find yourself writing a two-page cover letter. Cut it in half, and then trim it some more. Keep it tight. Here’s why: When Brad Karsh, author of How to Say It on Your Resume (Prentice Hall, 2009) and a frequent guest on CNN, was a recruiting director, he received 10,000 resumes and 9,000 cover letters. He says applicants should expect a hiring manager or recruiter to spend 10 seconds scanning the cover letter and another 10 seconds on the resume.

Those 10 seconds turn into a full read only if there is a narrative hook, no mistakes, and a clear idea that the applicant is showing that his or her skills fit the company.

Most people just rewrite their resumes into a cover letter. Instead, Karsh says, "you have to think of the cover letter as a movie trailer."

He says most job applicants include the same four boring paragraphs: how you heard about the job, why you are interested, why you’d be great at it, and, finally, how you are going to follow up. “You’ve written a lot of words and essentially given me no information,” says Karsh.

Avoid empty buzzwords like facilitate, transition, and utilize, and instead make sure you understand the lingo of the industry you are seeking a job in. Merely using fancy words that you think sound like they should be from business school will not impress a hiring manager.

Just say what you mean in simple, clear language. (And everyone says they are a team player and a problem solver. Those go without saying.)

Managers are busy people, with lots of office problems to solve. “Don’t waste my time if you aren’t going to add value,” Karsh says.

So go into it knowing that your competitors for that job will have similar if not better education and work experience. What makes you stand out from the rest? Why would the hiring manager plug you into his or her team? What makes you good in the trenches with your future teammates? These details and anecdotes can oftentimes be the hook that you need to get your foot in the door.

This article is an excerpt from Smart is the New Rich: Money Guide for Millennials by Christine Romans. Reprinted with permission from Wiley.

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