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Develop Your Skills

123 posts
    Annie Sullivan
Annie Sullivan
Content Marketing, Wiley

adults.jpgIt’s a badge of honor to be an intern who goes on to be hired as a fulltime employee because that means you impressed your manager and colleagues enough to grant you a place on the team. Here’s how to go from inexperienced intern to permanent hire:

 

1.   Network any chance you get.

 

Attend happy hour events or other social gatherings that the company might offer. Say hello to everyone you pass in the hallway. Introduce yourself as an intern and ask the other person what his or her role is.

 

At the end of your internship, your team may not have an opening, but another team might. By putting yourself out there, you might just be introducing yourself to your future boss. You also get bonus points if you can remember the names of the people you’ve met and greet them the next time you cross paths.

 

2.   Ask for more work.

 

When you’ve completed the projects on your to-do list, don’t just sit there twiddling your thumbs or scrolling through Instagram. Instead, let your boss know you have some free time and ask if there’s anything else you can help with. Demonstrating good time management and your commitment to getting the job done will get people’s attention.

 

3.   Never miss a deadline.

 

Over deliver if possible—but definitely never miss a deadline. Even one missed deadline could overshadow all the other work you completed on time in your manager’s mind. If you need to, cut your lunch break short or stay later to get the project done.

 

4.    Suggest solutions.

 

Is there something your company is doing that you think could be done in a better, more efficient way? If so, speak up. Or maybe there’s something you know another company does that your company doesn’t.

 

Showing initiative will impress your boss—and the more you know about the company or entrench yourself in future projects, the more likely they are to keep you around. 

 

5.   Dress the part.

 

Don’t underestimate the power of your appearance. Remember the old adage that you should dress for the job you want. Don’t show up dressed for the club you’re going to later that night. Always look presentable and professional so that people will take you seriously.

 

6.   Show your interest.

 

Constantly check the internal job postings. Is there a role that piques your interest? Let your manager know. Showing that you want to work at the company long term will keep your name top of mind—and maybe even give hiring managers the push they need to ask for an extra head to be added to their department.

 

Getting your foot in the door as an intern is an invaluable experience. You’ve got a head start on applying for positions because you’re already familiar with the company’s systems and inner workings. If you capitalize on that knowledge and follow the steps outlined above, you might just find yourself in a fulltime position before you know it.

 

About Annie Sullivan:

 

After interning at Wiley for three consecutive summers and working a brief stint as a temporary employee while getting her master’s degree in creative writing, Annie Sullivan is now Wiley’s in-house copy specialist. She is also the author of the forthcoming young adult book A Touch of Gold (HarperCollins). You can follow her on Twitter (@annsulliva) or on her blog: anniesullivanauthor.wordpress.com.

 

Image Credit: pexels.com/rawpixel.com

 

    Laura Goldsberry
Laura Goldsberry
Marketing Manager, Wiley

We asked more than 500 B2B buyers about what more sellers could do to earn appointments and close  sales. Over one-third of the responses were related to the credibility of the seller. See what buyers in our survey had to say and learn how you can build credibility with buyers and earn more business.

 

Image credti: Milles Studio/Shutterstock

    Christopher Ruel
Christopher Ruel
Community and Social Marketing, Wiley

Are you looking for ways to increase your verbal communication effectiveness and get people to give you their full attention when you speak? You can add power to what you say by using non-verbal communication techniques to reinforce your words. Do you know what "steepling" is, and how it demonstrates confidence and a commanding presence? Or how a simple gesture of placing your hand over your heart expresses sincerity in a meaningful way? Learn about these and other techniques, as well as the psychology behind them in this infographic, 7 Hand Gestures Guaranteed to Get People to Listen to You, brought to you courtesy of Barbara Davis at PoundPlace.

 

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    James Bowen
James Bowen
CEO, Experiential Simulations

Professor Linda Glenn MacDonald of the University of California, Santa Cruz discusses the ethical issues around technology, including the extensive online data gathering happening today. She raises concerns about whether society will shape technology or whether technology will shape society. These problems are indeed complex, but she shares ways that we might approach these challenges along with other ideas to consider.

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James Bowen, is an author, professor and CEO of Experiential Simulations, a producer of simulations for teaching entrepreneurship and ethics.

 

Image credit: pexels.com/Tyler Lastovich

    Christopher Ruel
Christopher Ruel
Community and Social Marketing, Wiley

Without meaning to, and often with the best of intentions, many organizations continually waste precious time and money on processes and activities that don't create value and no longer make sense in today's business environment.  Do you recognize any of these supposed "best practices" in the slide deck below? The new book Detonate: Why - And How - Corporations Must Blow Up Best Practices (and bring a beginner's mind) To Survive. explains how organizations built up bad habits, identifies which ones masquerade as "best practices," and suggests alternatives that can contribute to winning in the marketplace. Learn more about the book here.

 

 

Excerpted with permission of the publisher, Wiley, from Detonate by Geoff Tuff and Steven Goldbach. Copyright © 2018 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. This book is available wherever books and ebooks are sold.

 

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    Tara Trubela
Tara Trubela
Content Marketing, Wiley
MA, Columbia University

 

 

My son Liam can tinker with his Star Wars Legos for hours—constructing towers, makeshift vehicles, and other-worldly structures only to tear them down and start again, all with the concentration of a true Jedi.

 

As Liam plays, he’s truly in the moment. But according to a Harvard study, we spend 47% of our time thinking about something other than what we are doing.

 

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Gill Hasson, author of Mindfulness, says, “Mind wandering becomes a problem when you are ruing the past, or worrying about the future.” So how can we harness our thoughts—especially at work where it’s easy to get distracted—to be the most efficient and engaged version of ourselves?

 

Mindfulness, or being present without judging your thoughts or feelings, helps you feel grounded and calm when faced with any type of situation. Through mindfulness, you’re more open to new ideas and ways of doing things both in life and in your career.

 

According to Hasson, practicing mindfulness can enhance the following aspects of work:

 

INTERVIEWS

 

Considering that every corporate job opening attracts 250 resumes, of which only 4 to 6 applicants are called in for an interview, preparing for the big day is nerve-wracking. What questions will the interviewer ask? What’s the company culture like? Where do I see myself in five years?

 

First, let go of past interviews that may not have gone in your favor and prepare for the one at hand. Research your potential employer’s markets, services, and biggest competitors. Read over your application to anticipate potential questions. Lay out your (wrinkle-free) outfit the night before.

 

During the interview, wait until the interviewer is finished speaking before you answer. Hasson advises, “If you need a minute to think, say so. If you are uncertain what the interviewer is asking, say so.” This thoughtful approach shows that you are confident enough to ask for clarification instead of firing off answers that miss the mark.

 

PRESENTATIONS

 

Fear of public speaking is the most common phobia, second only to the fear of dying. In fact, the National Institute of Mental Health reports that 73% of the population suffers from “presentation anxiety.”

 

First, rehearse your presentation in front of a mirror and then for a friend or colleague and ask for honest feedback. A few minutes before, do some simple breathing exercises to center yourself. Once you get started, use PowerPoint™ slides as guides for your audience to make it a more organic interaction (don’t read from or memorize a script).

 

Remember, being mindful is to be “in the moment,” so don’t rush your presentation—speak slowly, pause after main points, and repeat back audience questions to make sure you give adequate answers.

 

MEETINGS

 

Most employees attend 62 meetings each month, and half of them are considered a waste of time. When asked, 92% of workers admit to multi-tasking during a meeting, prompting companies like HubSpot to replace sit-down meetings with 10-minute “stand ups” to keep everyone focused and alert. 

 

A few minutes before a meeting, breathe to clear your mind of your never-ending to-do list. Write down your remaining tasks on a piece of paper and set it aside for later.

 

If the conversation starts to veer off-topic during the meeting, jot down issues to be addressed at another time. Also, pay attention to fellow attendees’ body language. If anyone looks confused, take a second to clarify the main points. If you feel uncertain about something, paraphrase what you’ve heard and ask for confirmation.

 

Most importantly, don’t let meetings drag on and wrap things up with actionable to-do items so that everyone is on the same page and aware of next steps.

 

How do you practice mindfulness at work? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

 

Image Credit: aitooff//pixabay

 

    Jon Gordon
Jon Gordon
Author, Keynote Speaker & Leadership Expert

Behind every great team is a strong culture; great leadership; and passionate, committed people.


There’s a reason why all great teams have a great culture. It’s because culture is the living and breathing essence of what a team believes, values, and does. Team culture is the written and unwritten rules that say how a team communicates, connects, thinks, works, and acts.


pixabay_pexels-photo-209640.jpegCulture isn’t just one thing. It’s everything. Culture drives expectations and beliefs. Expectations and beliefs drive behav- iors. Behaviors drive habits. And habits create the future.

 

When Apple was just the two Steves (Jobs and Wozniak), they knew the culture they wanted to create. They would be the culture that challenged the status quo. Everything they did, including hiring people, running campaigns, and creating products, was influenced by this culture. Even now, the culture continues to influence everything they do and the way they do it. It’s why Apple is famous for its maxim, “Culture beats strategy.” You have to have the right strategy, of course, but it is your culture that will determine whether your strategy is successful.

Your most important job as a team is to create a culture— and not just any culture. You must create a positive culture that energizes and encourages each other, fosters connected rela- tionships and great teamwork, empowers and enables your team to learn and grow, and provides an opportunity for you to do your best work.

 

Create Your Culture

When I was a sophomore on the Cornell lacrosse team we were ranked ninth in the country. I was the starting face-off mid- fielder and we played a tough game against West Point that went into sudden-death overtime, which means the first team to score wins. I remember standing at the face-off circle in the middle of the field thinking, If I lose this face-off we will likely lose the game. I need to win it.

           
I lost the face-off and, the next thing I knew, my opponent was running down the field along the sideline with the ball. I was so mad that I ran as fast as I could and somehow caught up and hit him really hard and the ball fell out of his stick. I picked it up before he did and, as he pushed me out of bounds, I jumped in the air and threw the ball behind my back to my friend and teammate, John Busse, who caught the ball with one hand and threw it to our other teammate, Joe Lando, who scored the game winner for us.

           
Please know I’m not telling you this to impress you with my athletic ability. It was my one and only great play in college. I’m telling you this because we won so many close games that year. But during my senior year, we lost a lot of close games. We even had a chance to beat Princeton, who won the national championship, in overtime but couldn’t pull it off.

           
Looking back, I can see that the clear difference between my sophomore year and my senior year was our team culture. We had lost the championship culture that had been created. As Boston Celtics head coach Brad Stevens says, “Your culture is not just your tradition. It’s the people in the locker room who carry it on.” Unfortunately, my fellow teammates and I didn’t create or carry on the culture of our older teammates before us.

           
I wish I had been the leader then that I am now but, unfortunately, I wasn’t. I didn’t know how important culture was to the success of a team. I didn’t know you could lose your culture. I didn’t know that culture and performance could change so quickly. I now know that building a great team begins with creating a great a culture. I know that, as a team, you are always creating your culture. You are creating culture every moment of every day by what you think, say, and do. It doesn’t matter what your culture was like yesterday or last year. What matters is what you are doing to create it today.


Culture is Dynamic Not Static

People often look to leadership when it comes to the culture of an organization and team—and they should. Leaders have a huge influence on the culture. They set the tone and decide what the team values and stands for, but it’s important to note that your culture is brought to life and created by everyone on your team.

           
You and your team members have a huge influence on your culture and the culture you create. It’s not just about what your manager, school principal, boss, coach, or supervisor says and does. It’s also about what you say and do. If you are a part of a negative culture, don’t see yourself as a victim and by- product of it. Instead get together with your team and create a positive culture to replace it.


Culture is not static; it’s dynamic. You can change it by what you say. You can elevate it by what you think. You can improve it by what you share. You can transform it by what you do. You can be a positive team that creates a positive culture right now.


Make Your Bus Great

People often ask me what to do if they are part of an organiza- tion with a negative culture but desire to have a positive culture in their department or team. I tell them what I shared in my book, The Energy Bus.

           
You may not be driving the big bus but you can make your own bus great. Create the culture of your team and show the rest of the organization what a positive team looks like.

           
Over the years I’ve had many teams do this and report to me that their team inspired other teams. In some cases, the positive team became the model for the entire organization, and transformed it as a result.

           
Never doubt the impact that a positive team can have on its organization, community, and, ultimately, the world. When you make your bus great, you show what’s possible and help others drive toward greatness.

 

Jon Gordon was once one of us, frustrated with his circumstances, blaming everyone else for his troubles, fearful, negative, miserable and trying to figure it all out. Now, the worldwide bestselling author, keynote speaker and leadership expert is the guy everyone is turning to for major breakthroughs in successful team building and powerful inspiration. In the decade-plus since the publication of his critically acclaimed book and Wall Street Journal bestseller “The Energy Bus (10 Rules to Fuel Your Life, Work and Team with Positive Energy),” Gordon’s principles are continually being put into practice, making a huge impact in America’s boardrooms, locker rooms, classrooms and beyond.

 

 

Read Jon Gordon’s latest book, The Power of a Positive Team: Proven Principles and Practices that Make Great Teams Great to learn more about practical tools to help teams overcome negativity and enhance their culture, communication, connection, commitment and performance.

 

Excerpted with permission of the publisher, Wiley, from The Power of a Positive Team by Jon Gordon. Copyright © 2018 by Jon Gordon. All rights reserved. This book is available wherever books and ebooks are sold.

 

    James Bowen
James Bowen
CEO, Experiential Simulations

Ufeli Ani, with her background in regulatory compliance and organizational governance, discusses how regulatory compliance can be viewed as an opportunity to create strategy differences by analyzing data generated by regulatory compliance. She also shares how governance and regulatory compliance are evolving fields that organizations can use to implement best practices.

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James Bowen, your host, is an author, professor and CEO of Experiential Simulations, a producer of simulations for teaching entrepreneurship and ethics.

 

To dive deeper into topics regarding regulatory compliance and organizational governance, read Governance, Risk Management, and Compliance: It Can't Happen to Us--Avoiding Corporate Disaster While Driving Success by Richard M. Steinberg.

 

Image credit: pexels.com/Martin Damboldt

 

    James Bowen
James Bowen
CEO, Experiential Simulations

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Owen Crisp is a marketer with experience spanning large and small companies including both digital and analog based marketing venues. Owen discusses the strategic and tactical considerations in choosing digital channels along with metrics both immediate and longer term. He discusses considerations around awareness, content, market segmentation, post-purchase activities and relevancy.

 

 

James Bowen, your host, is an author, professor and CEO of Experiential Simulations, a producer of simulations for teaching entrepreneurship.

    Luke Doyle
Luke Doyle
NeoMan Studios

When you’re an introvert, work meetings can be difficult. You know they're unavoidable, and while you may have something amazing to contribute, you're not thrilled by the idea of speaking up.

 

The truth is, you don’t need to be an extrovert to excel in group meetings. This handy guide will help you harness your introverted nature to your advantage.

 

As an introvert, you have a great set of skills. Begin capitalizing on them to form a new approach to meetings, and you’ll feel less intimidated and more creative and productive.

 

An-Introverts-Guide-to-Getting-Your-Voice-Heard-in-a-Meeting.jpg

Courtesy of: On Stride Financial

 

Call to action: What are your best meeting strategies? Let us know in the comments below.

 

    James Bowen
James Bowen
CEO, Experiential Simulations

Brigitte Baumann, founder of the global angel investor group Go Beyond Investing, describes her program for young people to learn angel investing including a teaching concept that motivates learning. James Bowen, your host, is an author, professor and CEO of Experiential Simulations, a producer of simulations for teaching entrepreneurship

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James Bowen, your host, is an author, professor and CEO of Experiential Simulations a producer of simulations for teaching entrepreneurship.James Bowen Podcast_resized.jpg

 

Image: pexels.com/Leigh Patrick

    James Bowen
James Bowen
CEO, Experiential Simulations

Brigitte Baumann, founder of the global angel investor group, Go beyond Investing, describes her methodology for developing entrepreneur teams using learning by interacting incorporating diversity of thought. She also talks about entrepreneurship as a profession.

 

James Bowen, is an author, professor and CEO of Experiential Simulations a producer of simulations for teaching entrepreneurship.James Bowen Podcast_resized.jpg

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10 Facts About the Gig Economy

Posted Apr 20, 2018
    Christopher Ruel
Christopher Ruel
Community and Social Marketing, Wiley

What is a gig economy? According to Investopedia, gig economies arise when companies, rather than hiring full-time employees, engage independent contractors and freelancers. Since a large number of workers want to participate in a gig economy for any number of reasons, the results are cheaper and more efficient services.

 

How much do you know about a gig economy? We found ten facts about today’s gig economy and the motivation behind workers wanting more flexible employment opportunities.

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  1. 1/3rd of all workers in the U.S. and European Union are freelancers and 86% of professional freelancers choose freelancing.
  2. 36% of the U.S. workforce, or 57 million people freelanced in 2016
  3. Nearly 20% of U.S. full-time independent contractors earn more than $100,000.
  4. By 2020, it is estimated that 7.6 million Americans will be working in the gig economy.
  5. 63% of executives would choose freelancing if given the opportunity.
  6. 69% of millennials regret not choosing a job with better work/life balance and 44% wish they enjoyed their job more.
  7. 74% of North American office workers would quit their current jobs if offered a job that allowed them to work remotely more often.
  8. 44% of business leaders believe the changing nature of work and flexible work are the greatest drivers of industry change.
  9. While 50% of U.S. jobs are compatible with remote work arrangements, only 7% of employers make flexible hours available to employees
  10. Just 30% of U.S. employees consider themselves engaged at work.

 

Image Credit: pexels.com/negative_space

A New Way to Think About Startups

Posted Apr 11, 2018
    James Bowen
James Bowen
CEO, Experiential Simulations

Chris Albinson has a broad background in startups in California and other regions. He speaks about how new cost models and data analytics are being used to assess startups along with attributes that define successful startups. As we enter a more innovative and fast paced startup era, he discusses new thinking for universities and colleges teaching entrepreneurship along with suggestions for entrepreneurs/investors looking to start a company.

 

James Bowen, your host, is an author, professor and CEO of Experiential Simulations ,a producer of simulations for teaching entrepreneurship

 

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Image credit: pexels.com/startupimages

 

    CJ Hwu
CJ Hwu
Director, Government Affairs Asia Pacific, Wiley

The global shortage of highly skilled workers with digital science and analytics (DSA) skills is expected to reach 38-40 million by 2020. In Vietnam, the shortage will be over 500,000 employees. Cisco estimates that 80% of the 54 million workers in Vietnam lack the necessary skillsets to fully participate in the digital economy. The result is billions of dollars in lost revenue annually.CJ Hwu and Jeffrey Goss.png

 

To address this skills gap, Project DARE (Data Analytics Raising Employment) brought together global employers, university representatives and government from APEC member economies to develop
a set of 10 workplace-ready competencies for DSA-enabled workers (
Recommended APEC Data Science and Analytics Competencies).

 

Launched last year and supported by Wiley and the Business Higher Education Forum (BHEF), the Project DARE framework introduces a first-of-its-kind list of core DSA competencies combining
technical skills and critical soft or workplace skills needed by employers. DARE is currently building on this framework to develop tools, content and other resources to deploy these competencies in university and corporate settings.

 

Taking that framework to Vietnam, one of the supporting economies of Project DARE, Wiley and Arizona State University (ASU) conducted a workshop in March, attended by Vietnam higher education institutions, multinationals and government agencies to prioritize the recommendations, as well as identify gaps in the Vietnam context.

 

According to the group, the top three competencies needed in Vietnam are:

  • 21st century skills, including DSA capabilities at all levels,
  • Data Management & Governance,
  • Operational Analytics.

 

Other needed skills include cybersecurity knowledge and applied Artificial Intelligence.

 

Following the workshop, Chris Gray, Wiley’s VP Knowledge & Learning, appeared on an Industry 4.0 Panel on Public Private Partnerships at ASU’s annual STEMCON Conference in Ho Chi Minh City. He echoed the themes of Project DARE.

 

“Automation and new technologies are not a new phenomenon. Fears about their transformation of the workplace and effects on employment date back centuries, to before the First Industrial Revolution in the 18th century,” shared Chris. “In the third Industrial Revolution in the 1960s, US President Lyndon Johnson empaneled a ‘National Commission on Technology, Automation, and Economic Progress.’ Among its conclusions: ‘technology destroys jobs, but not work.’

 

“I think that is true for today as well. Many jobs will no longer exist or look very different, and brand new jobs will emerge,” he said.

 

Project DARE will next be tabled at the Asia Pacific Rim Universities’ Presidents and Senior International Leaders Forum in Taipei in June. In Vietnam, another focus group will be convened before the end of the year to explore piloting the Wiley/BHEF Data Science Foundations Course.

 

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Photo:: CJ Hwu, Director of Government Affairs, APAC, with Jeffrey Goss, Arizona State University’s Associate Vice Provost, Vietnam/SE Asia Programs, at the Vietnam DARE Workshop in Ho Chi Minh City.

Credit: Wiley

 

 

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